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, florida, ohio, and virginia. excuse me, three states. did so many, wisconsin, new hampshire. those are fundamentally favorable electrodynamics. i'm going to walk through the specifics in each of these. to designate president obama won florida by a grand total of 237,000. obama one ohio by a grand total of two ordered 50,000. pennsylvania was kind of a wipeout. carried by president obama by $620,000. wisconsin, smaller state and ohio, smallest it and florida, bigger vote margin. the census was carried by 410,000 votes for president obama. new hampshire win for obama by 68,000. a smaller number, but smaller state. fewer votes to pick up. i will let for obama by 136,000 votes and colorado went for one by 130,000. i told those up because the total up to about 2 million. for mitt romney to win the presidency he has to change about 0 million mines. he has to take 2 million of those voters in change and million of their minds. actually ferlies do. a very small number. do you realize that the campaign will spend approximately $2 billion on each side, more than $2,000 per vote will be spent
that are in columbus between here and cincinnati that were counties that were called the virginia military district. after the revolutionary war the officers and revolutionary army were given land in ohio the was part of the west of course in that time. they moved out here carry in their culture in the background of the company's light voting stake they didn't bring slaves with them. in ohio. but they were sympathetic to that culture. part of ohio also has been settled from west virginia, kentucky, tennessee. both states to the south of the appellation states and there's a part of ohio that is up alisa and southeastern ohio so there were southern sympathies. there's a lot of activity during the civil war and the there's the pro conservative activity and no chaim. the governor of ohio declared martial law. the and to the picture after the civil rights war where the politicians were going to be successful statewide. the southern sympathies and people with number sympathies. the grand army of the public which was the union army took many of its union officers from ally of. the established the republic
that are called the virginia military district. after the revolutionary war officers in the revolutionary army did not get paid but were given land and ohio. part of the west at that time. they moved out here. this sort of carried with them their culture and their background. they came from a slave owning state. it did not bring slaves with them. they were sympathetic to that culture. part of ohio also has been settled from west virginia, kentucky, tennessee, the states and the self, appellation, and indeed there is a part of a high of the really is appellation. again, there were seven separate piece. there was a lot of activity during the civil war 1/5. the governor of ohio at one point declared martial law and no higher to try to rein in the confederate sympathies and sympathizers who were here. so all of that adds up to the picture after the civil war where politicians are going to be successful statewide in ohio they had to appeal to both people with seven sympathies and people with north sympathies. on the northern side of the grand army of the republic to a committee of its officers from ohi
that are called the virginia military district. after the revolutionary war, officers in the revolutionary army who didn't get paid were given land in ohio. ohio's a part of the west, of course, at that time. they moved out here. they sort of carried with them their culture and their background. they came from a slave-owning state. they didn't bring slaves with them into ohio, but they were sympathetic to that culture. part of ohio also has been settled from west virginia, kentucky, tennessee. those states just to the south of us, appalachian states and, indeed, there's a part of ohio that really is ap lay a cha -- appalachia, and that's southeastern ohio. there were southern sympathies there. there was a lot of activity during the civil war that was pro-confederate activity in ohio. the governor of ohio at one point declared martial law in ohio to try to rein in the confederate sympathies and sympathizers who were here. so all of that adds up to a picture after the civil war where if politicians were going to be successful statewide in ohio, they had to appeal to both people with southern symp
did not on private property in the middle of virginia -- i did that on private property in the middle of virginia and the stuff that happened there that was quite disturbing, for me. should i -- why don't i read. sure, of course. by the end of the book, to end your question again, one of the things i learned was civic pride, having tried in the place i live. -- having pride in the place of the. along the way reenactors as they do think you'll become a reenactor? is this something you stick with? and so i didn't really think that it would. i was fascinated by the hobby and had a great time doing it. crazy adventure but i didn't really think that i would continue it. but a sword asked myself the question like well, what would i do. what they do if i was a reenactor? what with the choices i would make? in some regards this is my chance to editorialize but i hope this last chapter sort of reveals not only my sense of humor, but also my civic pride. and i wanted to do something about the place where i live. that's so difficult in los angeles because the history isn't that long, and it's no
. william perry harris then was a soldier here in ohio born in virginia. all three states claimed him but he was successful because he could adapt to the midwest. going into the 20th century with william howard taft, president of the united states, as cincinnati was a southern town and trade was with the south and home of the underground railroad. they can get at of kentucky and were safe and could be disbursed partying was from marion ohio, william mckinley elected president sell a bunch of ohio wins. james garfield you have presidents who came during this period after the civil war up through the 1920's pulling presidents from other parts of the country that tend to be more moderate. not ideologues that is still true statewide. attendance the to be more pragmatic and light -- less ideological. if you try to compete in the general election in helps to swing to the middle. but ohio generally is the average state. almost every demographic group is well represented here. catholic, fundamentalist, ma instream, protestants, ethnic groups. the only one is maybe the hispanics. some places as a sig
for massachusetts and new york let's build on that and so on. the bill of rights and george mason, virginia bill of rights. abolition of slavery occurred in various states, and then out of for a lesson, so what has gone before us clacks we have a duty to the future and i think they tried the best when they actually are understanding and respect all and that is part of the national archives. if i can just on a personal note tell you why i'm here. and justice thomas's presence is no explanation. what the heck am i doing here? when i was 11-years-old i came to the national archives and i got this document that is a big version of the emancipation proclamation, iain the innovation proclamation look at the 100th anniversary of the 50 years ago september 1962 and released at special edition for the kids like me and i got my picture of abraham lincoln. [laughter] that made the not cynical. they come at a very young age to a place like this the exposed to mr. langdon been exposed to the declaration of the independent constitution and i think i'm here today honestly because of that and i would like to gi
it is not possible to achieve. if people being put on the no right to exist list. virginia permanent and secure stay and it may never have been. i think we may have to think outside of the box. >> my book has nothing to do with the settlements but i went to south sudan the president told me about the war because of the land disputes because those forces do not want to see them living next door to them. fresno palestinian against the christians living today. nothing to do with boundaries with slander occupation but the very acceptance. >> spending 20 years on the issue with the zionists with no right to exist so this intolerance any community of people they call infidels. >> i have three questions if you can hear me. [laughter] what about iran are pakistan sells there know how to terrorists so it is not the state of iran who is attacking the terrorists? but the fourth state is orthodox. aren't atomic bombs altogether anachronistic of the next war will be cyberattack? thank you. >> i will answer only two of them with your permission. you are right to. nobody can guarantee of that technology will be us
in virginia lined up the scores of other people to have their marriage legalized. and this is happening all across the south. so many things were meaningful happening to people. and it was hard, but they seized with a coed and they moved forward. >> just to press the point a little bit more, there are business owners, property owners. and there's a college president, howard johnson. >> is that right? >> part of it is true. obviously all of what he described was true, but i think there was a lot more. i don't think that -- i didn't come away feeling worn down by the bleakness of it. i found it inspiring what people made up their lives despite everything and they did quite a lot. >> just to practice .1 step further, it struck me in reading it that by reducing the complexity because in a passage like that, and 750 word book review, it gives the impression that this is a kind of usual story, which is that it's all struggle and strike and these passing moments of brightness, but doom and gloom. >> as a person who writes about terrible things in the past, trust me well aware of how bad things get
from washington through virginia, the liner, we arrived in a little town and we were tight and beaten and left bloody but one of the same young men that attacked and beat me and my seatmate came to my office and should be wary of 09 and said mr. lewis, i'm one of the people that attacked. i want to apologize. please forgive me? his son was with him and he'd been encouraging his father to seek out the people that he attacked, start crying, the father started crying, they both gave me a hug and i started crying. this book speaks of reconciliation. the bill become the capacity to be reconciled to move towards the community and if you believe in something you should speak up and speak out and stand up and fight for a. you have to be consistent. you have to insist on the truth. not one thing is stronger than the truth. there may be setbacks and disappointment, but in the long scheme of things, you are going to win and succeed. the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence, the way of truth will win. this book has suggested whether it is in the middle east, and africa coming in
't a homosexuality to boddicker, it was the sexuality. >> where did you grow up? >> in norfolk virginia and virginia beach virgi
family in virginia that had been free for generations. in fact, one of those black families had opened slaves themselves. the kerry brothers, also, while they were cutting hair, would also sell anti-slavery publications on the sly, on the side. and the hero of the book, beverly snow, was -- ran the city's finest restaurant called the epicurean eating house. he's really the hero of the book. i think of him as a barack obama, slightly ahead of him time, a very clever and intelligent mixed-race man who comes out of nowhere to conquer and charm washington, serve the washington elite what they want only to face a tremendous backlash. and i think if you read the book, you'll see some parallels to our own time there. anyway, the point is that in this book far from slavery being dominant in washington, d.c. and all-oppressive force, slavery's actually receding, and the forces of liberty are growing, and that's really part of what this book is about. the second thing you probably think is you probably think the civil war began in, oh, you know, april 1861 with the, with the gunfire at fort sumt
loss, prop 23, totally funded by the koch brothers. legislation in west virginia to overturn the new mining safety rules that were put in place after the last mind disaster. the effort to overturn mining safety regulations funded by the koch brothers. i have in the book a page with 53 different organizations. a lot of them by the way research centers on college campuses around the country all for the purpose of disputing the existence of global warming and fighting to do away with any government regulations, so anything to do with climate control. 57 organizations that i was able to find that we do partially or totally funded by the koch brothers. their reach is so great that some has called them the kochapus. they don't do it alone. twice a year with their corporate buddies from around the country and raise money for right wing political cause. two days before the book came out i was so happy this happened because i could tell people you see, i'm not exaggerating. i'm not making this up to two days before the book came out they had their latest come out in palm springs. and i'll tel
. thanks. [applause] time for a couple questions if i may. the person with a virginia t-shirt and in the washington national. >> one of the characteristics i thought you might speak of at least in the phenomenal portion of your book about steve jobs was the characteristic of the focus and when he returned to apple to focus -- >> if i had to do the seven or eight lessons, simplicity is related to focus and what steve always did is i've got to filter out distractions. for example, when as you said returning to apple they were making like 40, 50 versions to milk the profit of it. he said why are we doing all of these computers? he said we have to focus and it's the home office laptop desktop that's it, for computers when they finally get the computers done right, they take that top 100 people and argue what should be the next product and biggar all of the white board to be, first page after two and a half days on the hundreds he crosses out the bottom seven and says we can only do three. we have to focus. and that's why the ipod ekimov iphone, ipad -- yes, sir. >> i wonder
] 1967 perhaps the best name case in supreme court history, loving versus virginia. what was the case? it was the case that said states could no longer than racial intermarriage. think about that. in 1967. there are people in this room who were alive in 1967. [laughter] it was still the legal and a lot of states for racial intermarriage. when barack obama's parents got married in kenya -- i'm sorry. [laughter] it is a cheap joke and i apologize but it does remind me. everybody knows mitt romney is having a rough patch as presidential candidate but a sentence i have not heard a word anywhere if only donald trump had been the nominee. because as you recall he sort of built this campaign around the idea that barack obama was born in kenya or some wherever than the united states, but the campaign did not take off and mitt romney is there for better or worse and in all seriousness when barack obama's parents got married in 1960i think it was, because it was in hawaii, that wasn't a freudian slip, that was just wrong to got married in hawaii and there were people in prison in this country f
this may be like the last supper. the fourth 1961. boarded a greyhound bus, from washington to virginia, atlanta. and arrived in a little town. left bloody. one of the same, the attack. came to my office. february 09 and said, one of the people that a tax. i want to apologize. will you forgive me? an incursion. cigarette the people there. the father start crying. i start crying. speak about reconciliation. the ability to capacity to be reconciled. move to a community. you believe in something you should speak of, speak out, stand-up and fight. yet to be consistent. you have to insist. nothing, nothing. not one thing is stronger than the truth. maybe some setbacks, may be some disappointment. the scheme of things they're going to win, you're going to succeed. the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence, the way of truth we will win out. this book is suggesting, for this in the middle east and africa, in america, any part of this planet, this little piece of real estate that we call earth, we can, as dr. king suggested, learn to live together as brothers and sisters or p
. while washington took the oath of office, two states, new york and virginia were agitating for a new constitutional convention. in the words of james madison and george washington, they were terrified at this prospect. they believed it would be infiltrated by enemies of the new government and that the constitution would be scrapped and done away with in that argument would be fractured, never ever to come together again. >> you can watch this and other programs at booktv.org. more from this year's roosevelt reading festival from the franklin the roosevelt presidential library and museum. mark huddle presents his book, "founding rivals: madison vs. monroe, the bill of rights, and the election that saved a nation". >> thank you very much, good morning. i am very pleased to be here with you. i hope you will be okay with the starting off with just a little bit of a reverie about libraries it is such a pleasure to be here. roy always world war ii "roi ottley's world war ii" requires the council counsel and work of archivists around the country. for those of us who revel in archival resear
a greyhound bus and traveled from washington to virginia. we arrived in a little town called redfield, south carolina. we were attacked and beaten and left bloody. one of the same young men attacked and beat me in my seat may came to my office in february 09 and said mr. lewis, i'm one of the people that attacked and beat you. i want to apologize. we forgive me? yet been encouraging his father to seek a people he attacked. started crying, father started crying. they both gave me a hug and i started crying. this book speaks about reconciliation, the ability and capacity to be reconciled, to move towards community, that if you believe in something you should speak out, speak out. you should stand up and you should pay for it. you have to be consistent. you have to insist. nothing, nothing, not one thing is stronger than the truth. there may be some set back. there may be some disappointment . but in a long scheme of things you're going to win, you're going to succeed. the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence, the way of shrews will win out. this book is suggesting whether it's
in america. [applause] rde over there. rde hyperion and from the university of virginia. i noticed in a lot of my christveran friends and real apathy when it comes to political issues do you think that this courio be something that motivates the church to get back involved in politics? ing w so, htes do we articulatet in order to get some excitement? rde tha18s wus a lot of other good books. showing the scandals and how he is tpeaing this into european-svesle s idveralism and many other things is doing wrong , s dh as violating a lot of oamer loss. nobody had risen about this one. have a co author he matameres n, ng book. a lot of the research for it. i hempe it is something that ng ma and their religious people realize we have our future at stpeaer to get with ire youh now, i have seen polls that 50 percent of the evangelicals are among the nonvoters. we need in this year. could your friends to get out there and be samere they get r ameoister and vote. >> how are you keep going? at 87 yronrs oriod boou are proy more relevant and icinortant to take them when you for started incho972. how d
at the university of virginia and the national project has done a lot of work on this. i imagine that these the things you have heard are ready. so, to maximize your happiness and make sure that your future as yet only imaginary children turn out really well. you're all going to rush out and get married. obviously people don't get married for this sort of calculated reasons. even if he did decide to get engaged as soon as possible it would be a little harder in the world today than they used to be because the other side of the kind of paradox of marriage and a 21st century is that just at the time when it has become obvious that marriage is in decline. a retreat from marriage, cohabitation, kind of falling in the hills of the divorce revolution in the earlier generation. you know, people say divorce rates have stabilized, but that may be because fewer people are even attempting marriage and the first place. on the one hand this institution is great for people and on the other hand people are retreating from it. it's not just in the marriage itself that we see this crisis in relat
their lives. at the time kennedy is having lunch. he had a house in virginia called hickory hill. there is a long green lawn that slopes down. robert kennedy is sitting at a table with robert morgan who is the u.s. attorney for new york and two things happen simultaneously. i spoke to morgan. all of a sudden he saw the house being repainted. there was a guy on the ladder painting and all of a sudden hes the short wave radio transistor radio they called it then to his fear and comes, ladder and starts to run towards us as fast as he can and at that moment the telephone rings on the table on the other side of the swimming pool and ethel kennedy gets the answers and says to robert kennedy it is j. edgar hoover and it is hoover telling robert kennedy that his brother has been hit and probably killed. we know on this plane johnson went in to president kennedy's bed room and made a call to robert kennedy. he asks for details of being sworn in and the exact wording of the vote you should take as president. now you are saying is johnson taking revenge for all the humiliations that robert
from alexandria, virginia. >> what books do you think shaped america? >> i think probably young adult books. i loved -- not the list but harry potter, and things i have -- student and fahrenheit 451, and to kill a mocking -- -- mockingbird. >> do yaw have any books you haven't read yet you might be interested in reading? >> some of the classics i've always meant to read and haven't. i want to go back and take a look at them. invisible man. i don't think i ever tackled that one. >> and we are back live at the national book festival here in washington, dc. this is day one of two days of coverage. the book festival has now expanded to two days and book tv will be live both days. of you want to see our schedule go to booktv.org and we're pleased to be joined with rajiv chandrasekaran, an associate editor at the was post, and most recently the author of this book, "little america" about the war in afghanistan. but where did the term little america come from? >> it came from a remarkable project in the 1950s, led by a team of american engineers, to develop parts of southern afghanistan to d
from the presidential tapes project at the university of virginia's miller center, transcripts from the kennedy white house about how kennedy managed the outcome making sure the missiles were removed from cuba to managing congress and the results of the crisis. >> what's mr. coleman's background? >> he's at the university of virginia, both history department and at the miller center. >> how long have you been with norton, and how long have you been chairman and president? >> okay. 36 years in norton. i started norton right out of college, been running the place for the last 18 years, and chairman since 2000. >> when it comes to e-books and real books, what is the break down revenue-wise and so on? >> so on our trade sales in the last year, which we just finished up, tracked 21% e-books we are industry average. some genera publishers see much higher figures in terms of percentage, and certainly, when we look at fiction sales on an individual title, on one occasion we saw over 50% e-book sales to p-book sales. >> you predict e-books will take 50% and more? >> i think we're going to pl
of the arpa said the united states actually. but he ended up with my first job in richmond, virginia and my landlady, lambert to be, their last name was the, so we called them the grandfather of the neighborhood. they had never met in asian before. in fact, one week and they invited whole family to come see an asian. and one of the relatives is disappointed because i was not worried one of those ching dynasty cubes. when i told them i was from san francisco, they think you mean that city of san? [laughter] [applause] >> i'm so glad with so many wonderful friends at the neighborhood tonight. >> you spoke of the old-school irish americans who are here. is there anyone who is like a liaison between the old images that were that were sort of heroic? >> yes, in fact in my book said i wanted to write a history of san francisco as if dashiell hammett had written it. the opening was the carrot or vincent hallinan, the crusading lawyer who grew up in very irish catholic, you know, family, but reject did a lot of what he had grown up and and became the link to the new. he starts off assertive and nic
at the university of virginia and the national marriage project has done a lot of work on this, and i actually acknowledge that these are things you have heard already. so, to maximize your happiness and make sure that your future as yet only imaginary children turn out well, you're going to rush out and get marked for identification. right and obviously people don't get married for those calculating reasons. but even if you did decide to get engaged as soon as possible, it would be a little harter in the world today than it used to be. because the other side of the kind of paradox of marriage in the 21st century is that just at the time when it's become obvious that marriage is really good for people, marriage is in decline. wilcox talks about a retreat from marriage and a cohabitation revolution following on the heels of the divorce revolution and the earlier generation, and people say divorce rates have stabilized but that may be because fewer people are even attempting marriage in the first place. so, on the one hand we have this is great for people. oregon we have got people are retreatin
, whatever you think of douglas macarthur, and if you want to go down to -- is it -- is down in virginia, newport news, his body is down there, but if you think of macarthur, and a lot of people love macarthur and his you know been removed in he comes back to wild celebrations, but if you go to the truman library and read all the letters about when truman removed macarthur from korea you see a lot of people say how could you do this? this is one of america's war history but there's thousands of war heroes -- letter saying thank god. thank god you got rid of a guy who'd didn't have the best interest of his men at heart. his own interest was his glory in war. and, therefore, may decisions that resulted in more casualties and were not necessary. i'm not saying that macarthur's decisions were all wrong. i'm giving you a perspective on macarthur's decisions from the men who fought under him. and it was next. if eisenhower had run against macarthur for president in the '50s, who do you think would have one? eisenhower. eisenhower had a reputation for being somewhat considerate and and passive
companies to put out the fire, they had different companies from the virginia ariane and the d.c. area and only those using globe fire systems were able to work through the night and deal with the pathogens and extremities in the pentagon building. one of the people the commanders at the pentagon called up rob freeze, he said we need 300 here tomorrow. what is the size? don't know. just figure out how to get them there. so this small company in new hampshire, 300 people assembled these fire suits. he was about to take the mercy flight after 9/11. he delivered these and use them to put out the fire in the pentagon. the story of patriotism is more than that. what allows fire suits to have these advantages? one of the biggest insights came in a production each fission see. they were able to make fire systems much cheaper than foreign competitors and the idea i go into detail about in the book came from one of the employees on the assembly line who said if you use a smaller size neil data smaller size needle will make smaller holes and it will save fabric and costs and this was an idea tha
legislation in west virginia to overtorn the mine safety after that last disaster, the effort to overturn mining safety regulations funded by the koch brothers. have in the book a page with 53 different organizations, a lot of them, by the way, research centers on college campuses around the country all for the purpose of disputing the existence of global warming and fighting to do away with any government regulations that would have anything to do with climate control. .. i'm sure rick scott is in there. supreme court justices, scalia, thomas, alito, they have all been there to these meetings. and this one, the book cannot about a month or so ago. they raised $100 million in one weekend. the thing about that, if you look at the super packs for romney in santorum and ron paul and newt gingrich up and tell super tuesday, we had spent a total for all the candid it's of $53 million. and in that one weekend a raised $100 million. so they are huge. they're out there, and it will say and do anything. of course it is a lot easier for them now censuses united because you have not only
fire companies to put out the fire, they had different companies come from the virginia area and the d.c. area and they noticed that only the companies that were wearing these fire suits were able to work through the night and deal with the pathogens and extremities that were in the pentagon building. so, one of the people, the commanders and the pentagon called up rot -- rod friese and said we need 300 fire suits tomorrow. he says what's the size? i don't know, just find out how to get them there. so, rod friese, in this small company of new hampshire -- about 300 people -- assembled these fire suits. rod friese was the only one was able to take a mercy flight after 9/11, the only one in the air space, delivered these fire suits and they used them to put out the fire in the pentagon. so it is a story about patriotism, but it's more than that. i wanted to know well, what is it that allows the fire suits to still has these comparative advantages. in one of the biggest insights for global fire suits came in a production efficiency. they are able to make fire suits much cheaper than a lot
person in virginia and got you could be sold back into slavery and those people once they got -- they were not going though there was slavery. it is an alien culture. slavery was legal. surprise to me. this was not plantation slavery. mrs. thornton had a servant who was her driver and was the jack of all trades and fixed the wagon and did all of that. george plant had a wife who was freed in georgetown and had four kids and they were free and he would go home at night and in the morning he would go and was a slave who communicated but that was one of the variations of slavery in washington at that time. also a lot of slaves made money by their owners would hire them out. the owner would say you would be hired out to the honor of a hotel. you would be a waiter in a hotel. the owner of the hotel would pay your own your wages but you were there. you could make tips and control your time so it was a much more fluid thing. that is why the anti slavery movement could get going because there was more room to operate and this was one of the things key was upset about that these corner
of the us in the room, we had a real presidential contest right next door in virginia, and we could go over there and canvas and make a difference for president obama. seems to me a lot of us after that said, okay, now you're president, you go to it. that was a huge mistake. that doesn't answer your question, but it's just maybe adding to the question. i think over a period of time it really it -- it's a combination of getting more people who are community kateing in this way -- communicating in this way and all the ways, using social media and everything else, and there are people in the room who do that all the time, do fabulous work, it all makes a difference. it's organizing at the local level that we need to have that needs to get better, and the other thing is, i think, i would have thought we would have reached the tipping point by now, to use another author's term, and we have not, but my analogy, by reference to the progressive era sunlights that it's out -- suggests it's out there. .. >> my name is matthew. we don't want to -- we would also be useful and mine the data as it declin
in 1957. i can remember, we were living in northern virginia, and we were driving past segregated schools every day when we went, we were in school in the northern virginia area. and what the gop has done since the late '50s is it has established itself in the south, but it did so come and julie's dad, a follow up on this as well, as was reagan and other important republican politicians, when the south became a two-party region, it became that on the basis of economic and private enterprise questions. texas became a republican state because of tremendous and very rapid economic development in texas, develop in the energy sector and so forth. virginia and north carolina and other states by the idea was that the republicans were not going to south and outbid the democrats on segregation. but they would try to transcend the issue by emphasizing economic develop and. this is the connection between the republican party, for as long as i can remember. julie and i were guests in the white house about six years ago, and we had an occasion after dark to walk on the south lawn and around the drivew
. there's parts of virginia where the union army has a foothold, slavery still exists in those areas. >> president lincoln issued an early version of the emancipation proclamation following the union victory at antietam. take your questions on the battle and repercussions of the single bloodiest day of fighting in american history to day life from antietam national battlefield at me
in september, the first continental congress meets in philadelphia. george washington of virginia shows up. the practically the first night he was there he was invited to dinner at the shippen home. peggy met him then for the first time and knew him very well until she had a falling out. and we get the declaration of independence when she's 16 which is literally signed about a block and a half around the corner from the family's fancy home. and then we get to september 1777, and the british. >> and the person chosen to be the military governor of the philadelphia area is benedict arnold. now, by that time he's had a grievous o leg wound that's made him unable to ride a horse and have to ride in a coach, and he's won -- he's proved himself to be the most awe cautious and -- audacious and able battlefield commander on the continental army side. recognized that way by george washington. so he's 38, and peggy is 18 when they, when they marry. they have a courtship of about a year. and this happens -- let me back up just a little bit. peggy can became kind of -- peggy became kind of this societ
. new jersey. [applause] and virginia. 2010. massachusetts senate. ted kennedy. ted kennedy's old senate seat goes to a republican, scott brown. 2010, congressional races, and the republican sweep. control of the house slips to republicans. 2012, wisconsin, governor scott walker holds on to his seat. hold on to his seat pile whopping seven points in a state where progressivism was founded. wisconsin, a place where government sector unions were founded. the american people are speaking with their vote, and it is a resounding, a resounding rejection of a obama's kind of redistribution is an unstated some. final point on this, we have to do this as happy warriors. nobody loves president reagan more than i do. i became a conservative because when i was young and developing my political values reagan was president, and i remember being in fifth grade or sixth grade and thinking, y'all. what he's saying is absolutely right. of course i was so young at the time that i did not know why he was right. it was just something instinctive with me. and then as i grew up, has : college i understood why
] you hear a lot about virginia. and i tend to think that new york didn't have much to do with anything. but i discovered that it all happened here. it all happened here. and, you know, kind of want to start a battle with my friend in tbons saying, yeah, yeah, but washington and the continental army pretty much, you know have [inaudible] in and around new york city which the british controlled for pretty much the whole war. so then it come the -- why did they camp here and not here and you know what did the hills matter? and that's just the book one of the questions for me. what did the hills matter? what did the hills have to say? really looking for, you know history in. >> one of the things you did here there's a picture on the cover of you in a row boat you escaped from manhattan. what was that about? >> i did. actually, i escaped from brooklyn. i attempted to escape from brooklyn. everything with me is a long story. i apologize. basically i tried to write about the weather and how it affected the various battles and people talk about providence and god came in and dropped a bomb. b
'm from virginia. >> what have you seen today's? >> i brought some students down here today and they're interested in the teens of course but i heard walter isaacson speak about the book from isaac einstein -- albert einstein. been talking a springboard. been less douglas freely talk about walter cronkite spit what books would you recommend to your students? >> any book is good. as elaborate on any book that inspires somebody that's great. sometimes we lose sight of the classics. the original classic. oak some alternate get my students to read is like brave new world. classics like mark twain, books that deal with racism and slaves that you might not, that they might appear to read mcpherson said this and say this is racist language. what's the message he is trying to say? we shall paper's other present or maybe a scientist. the library of congress has papers that are wonderful to read. >> do you think there any book should read recently are heard about recently the kind of accurately portray the state of our society and culture and the political system currently? >> not recently. i
and the amendment. many of the bill of rights, george mason you mentioned. he gives us virginia's bill of rights, and that's a model for the federal bill of"o rights. abolition of slavery occurred in various states and then at a federal level. we have to study, you know, and making what has gone before us. we have a duty to the future, but i think we discharge it best when we actually are understanding or respectful of the past, and that's part of what the national archives is about, and if i could just on a personal note tell you the story of why i'm here. justice thomas' presence needs no explanation, you're justice thomas. what the heck am i doing here? well, when i was 11 years?[: oli came to the national archives, and i got this document. it's a big, big version of the emancipation and proclamation, and it was an addition of the emancipation proke proclamation. it was the 100th anniversary, 50 years ago, september 1962, and the archives released that special edition for kids like me, and i got my picture of abe lincoln because i'm a lincoln man too. >> you don't throw anything out, do you?
. and so, rising before dawn, i climbed the stairs to my third floor room. yes, dear virginia, a room of my own, to read lindbergh's work, to study its historical framework, and to jot down my thoughts before sending my children off to school. my biography of and lindbergh would take more than 10 years to complete. during which i had the rare privilege of meeting her. 10 times. but the book was more than a biography. it was a journey towards self-knowledge, during which i developed a consuming interest in understanding the lives of women. not only women thinkers, but doers. women who were willing to enter the public fray and change the discourse. what were the qualities of person and mind, the value and loyalties of those women who succeeded, and what did they have to sacrifice to bring their goals to fruition? while researching the lindbergh book, two names kept cropping up. dorothy thompson, an american journalist, and her friend of 40 years, rebecca west, journalist, novelist, literary critic and historian. they eat atomized the kind of woman i was searching for. they play for high-stake
be outside of virginia and they are in an air-conditioned room. they are sitting in an ergonomic chair and they are looking for hours and hours on end at a scene in a place that they may never have been to. don't sleep the language, don't know the closer. and they are hovering over people's homes for days at a time, sometimes weeks at a time and they are the ones that price the kill button. studies have been done that show that these pilot are oftentimes having the same kind of trauma that soldiers on the battlefield have because they've been asked to do something but i think our brains are nowhere to do and that is to kill people remotely during the day and then go home in the evening to their families, where they are supposed to be loving fathers, and loving husbands come integrated members of their community, a part of their church group. this is very hard for some of these pilots to do. there's another problem the pilots talk about and that is poured in. they are sitting in front of the screen for hours and hours and hours on end. in fact, some of them say they would rather be in t
in virginia. may of 2003. the idea was that he had a lot to have offer the government and he might be able to get a reduction in the sentence based orb the information he could provide. unfortunately the case leaked, and government was forced to publicize his conviction that june. and at that point, everything went to heck. he was upset. he lost the bargaining chip. they were extremely interested in the somali immigrant. he ran a cell phone shop and had a family. they were tracking him and became more and more concerned about the shopping mall threat. the situation we were in thin, is here's somebody who may a throw away comment about shooting up a shopping mall, unbenortheast what that lead to is government agents spent weeks searching every mall in columbus at midnight. they would descend on malls with search teams, s.w.a.t. teams looking for anything maybe he was going to set off bomb. and so there's something a little bit comical about this notion that there might be bombs sitting in the pretty luxury shopping malls. the government couldn't take anything for granted. one throw away rem
founders the puritans from the north, with the quakers from pennsylvania who hated the virginia cavaliers who looked at the georgians did care libyans with contempt of -- content. they knew if america could succeed it would have to get unum out of all of the pluribus. [laughter] liberals heaped this and any type of common ground. they knew it is about drawing distinctions to make a list of ann and out groups. in 1994 all gourde gave a speech in milwaukee about world affairs during some down time between the time he invented the internet and discovered global warming. it turned to e pluribus unum. we could have a six base large enough for all supported entities to be the purpose in them out of what many. ice wed -- swear. his exact words. he was quickly mopped. it was a freudian slip. out of what many. that is what they really wanted to mean with a wonderful place their retired to stud in the constitution when they pray and others are left were not one may say what he pleases and do no harm to another. property conceived as the same attribute it is approved of my labor my good deprives you
. there are parts of virginia where the union army has a foothold. slavery still exists in those areas. mary stuckey talks about her book "defining america" the presidency and national identity [applause] >> now i have to try to be engaging. i think the most important thing to understand about the presidency and its context is that we always have choices. when you pick a president, you are absolutely picking a particular kind of policy but you are also picking a definition of our national identity. if you hear a president and like what they are saying and do you feel yourself call to that presidency, then they are speaking to you about a sense of the national self that is deeply embedded in all of us and every time there's a presidential election, what one of our previous presidents learned from his sorrow is really an important part of what the presidency does because we see ourselves as a nation through the ways that presidents talk the nation into being. so what i'm going to do today is talk a little bit about franklin roosevelt's version of what it meant to be an american added particular moment
. george mason u. mentioned. he first gets us virginia's bill of rights and that is a model the model for the federalist bill of rights. the abolition of slavery occurred in various days and then not the federal level so we have to study and what has gone before is? we have his duty to the future but i think because we charge up as one who actually are understanding and respectful of the past and that is part of what the national archives is about. if i could just on a personal note tell you the story of why i am here and justice thomas' presence needs no explanation. he is just as, so what the heck am i doing here? well, when i was 11 years old, i came to the national archives and i got this document, a big version of the emancipation proclamation, and it was an edition of the emancipation proclamation and can take a look, the 100th anniversary of the emancipation. 50 years ago september 1962 and archives release that special edition for kids like me and i got my picture of abe lincoln because i'm lincoln fan too. [laughter] and i came and perhaps what made me not cynical, coming at
guests. marjorie and west virginia.i'keo >> caller: good afternoon, gentlemen. i would like to know if educatin mr. friedman would entertain a proposal for me about education- i think that we want to talk about the future of our country and how education drasticallyooy needs revamped from preschool all the way up to college levelm i would love to e-mail you and v talk to you about my ideas, buto i'm very ill. stamina.ave much so i would love to have anversa conversation with you if i could leave my information with the people at c-span, i would be th. grateful.e let me tell you what i'm thinking. i have taught from kindergarten through college level courses, i have a certification as a r readingea specialist. my undergraduate is languageisof arts. and then i became a curriculum r specialist as part of my career. so i have a best perspective oft what needs to be done in thucational system, and i just think that we are not -- we keei trying to put band-aids on what our problems are in this country. and i think we just need to start from scratch. your >> host: thank you very much, we a
in a secret, closed deal made in virginia in 2003. the idea was that he had a lot to offer the government, and he might be able to get a reduction in his sentence based on the information he could provide. unfortunately, his case leaked, and the government was forced to publicize his conviction in that june. and at that point be everything went to heck, faris was very upset. he'd lost his bargaining chips. meanwhile, the government was extremely interest inside abdi, the somali immigrant. he ran a cell phone shop, he had a family, and they became more and more concerned about this shopping mall threat. here's somebody who made a throwaway comment about shooting up a shopping mall. unbeknownst to the people of columbus, what that led to was goth agents spent -- government agents spent weeks searching every mall in columbus at midnight. they would descend on malls with search dogs, s.w.a.t. teams looking for anything, for maybe he was going to set off a bomb. and so there's something a little bit comical about this notion that there might be a bomb sitting in these pretty luxurious shopping
in turn pretty much hated the virginia cavaliers who viewed the georgians with contempt. they were e pluribus kinds of guys, and they knew if america was to succeed, it would have to find a way to get an unum out of all that more bus. laugh now, liberals hate this. they hate any attempt to find common ground among us americans because their political principles and agenda is all about dividing us, drawing distinctions, making lists of in groups and out groups, turning us all into victims or victimizers. in 1994 al gore gave a speech at the institute of world affairs in milwaukee about, well, you guessed it, world affairs. this was during some down time in his ruly remarkable time somewhere between the time he invented the internet and the time he discovered global warning. [laughter] the subject turned to e pluribus unum. he said, quote, we can build a collective civic space separate for all of our differences. out of one, many. he said. that's what he said, i swear. those were his exact words. gore was quickly mocked for what many thought was a gaffe, an error. i don't think it was
. [applause] thank you. >> time for a couple of questions if i may. virginia, the person with the virginia t-shirt and then the washington national. >> one of the characteristics i thought you might speak of and one of the really phenomenal portions of the book where you talk about steve jobs was a characteristic of focus and when he returned to apple to focus. >> focus, right. simplicity is related to focus and what steve always did was i have got to filter out distractions. for example, as you said taking the example of returning to apple, they were making 40 or 50 versions of the mac to milk the profits of it and he said why are we doing all these computers? finally he said we have got to focus. his home office laptop desktops and said that's it, just for computers. we have to focus. likewise when they finally get goes for computers downright, they take the top 100 people at apple and they're arguing what should be our next project all on alike were. they'll fight to be in the first page of his whiteboard and yet 10 of them after two and a half days, he crosses out the bottom seventh and
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